Monday, December 28, 2015


Why St. Nicholas puts candy in boots and steals our hearts

Picture rom Deutsche Welle

Before I left on a trip to visit the Christmas markets of Bavaria and Austria in mid-December, I had hoped to have time to finish a Christmas holiday blog post.  Lacking packing organization, I got behind and had to put my good intentions aside.  Therefore, this post is appearing after December 6, the feast of St. Nicholas, and is even late for Christmas.  But the article in the blog I found for Germany's  Deutsche Welle broadcasting is so much fun and so full of information that it should be spotlighted, even if read in January.  There is always next year to be sure of a gift on St. Nicholas Eve and an understanding of how the saint became a kind of Santa Claus.

When I came across the above mentioned Deutsche Welle blog post, I was looking for information on what I should do to make sure St. Nicholas brought me something this year.  Because of our mixture of cultures in the United States, we have no hard-and-fast rules for St. Nicholas Eve. My ancestry is German, and I found the answer I wanted about the Germanic customs - although too late.

I also learned what kind of receptical (shoe, boot, etc.) the generous saint fills in other European countries. The title of the wonderful DW article is above their blog's picture ("Why St. Nicholas puts candy in boots and steals our hearts").  The explanation is so well written that I suggest you use this URL, to read a smile-producing account of the Saint who has been awaited by children for centuries.

I wonder if St. Nicholas will forgive my blog tardiness and give me another chance to share in his generosity next year?  What do you think?


  1. Sadly some previous pope back in 1969 did away with the canonization of several saints and Nicholas was one of them so he is no longer St. Nick is the Catholic faith.

    1. Since I am a Catholic, your comment took me by surprise. I knew nothing about St. Nick going the way of St. Patrick. I had to look that one up. It seems that St. Nicholas is definitely still considered a saint of the Roman Catholic Church but was removed from the Catholic Calendar, making a Holy Mass dedicated to him on Dec. 6 optional. He is also recognized as a saint by the Catholic Orthodox Church and the Anglican Church. St. Nicholas is one of my favorites so I'm glad he is still a Saint Santa Claus.